Monday, July 23, 2012

Hungarians- Toledo

An important immigrant group to Toledo and Northwest Ohio were the people that came from the area in Central Europe known as the Magyars. This area stretched from Poland to the North to Belgrade in the southern region. The area would also encompass the large area known as Transylvania. (No Dracula jokes) With the redrawing of borders after the first World War much would have been considered Hungary would have changed. Many large populations after this time would live in Romania, Slovakia and northern Yugoslavia. Some groups prior to World War 1 would be misidentified as Hungarians. The largest group of this ethnic group 1.7 million came to the United States starting in 1880. Many would locate in the Birmingham neighborhood in Toledo. In 1900 there were almost 17,000 people living in Ohio that claimed this nationality. By 1920 the number would increase to 73, 181. The primary group of immigration was males under the age of 30. Almost 90% of them were literate, but would take dangerous jobs that involved using their hands. This job areas in Toledo included automotive, glass and railroad industries. They tended to only come to the United States temporarily and over 50% would return to their homeland. Many would come back or just stay. The religion of the Hungarians in Toledo was Catholic. Their home church in town St Stephen's Catholic Church. The early population of this church was almost all Hungarian. This is a valuable place to check for church records for people of this nationality. The church was the center of their socialization activities. It would later become the center of their fraternal organizations. In Toledo a popular event was the Grape Harvest Festival and the Easter egg sprinkling. These groups and events played a important part of the assimilation of Hungarians into the fabric of Toledo. Family units in Hungarian early life extended beyond the immediate family. It was referred to as the "sib" and included aunts, uncles, cousins and godparents who might not be relatives. A common practice after 1910 was for Hungarian families to take in recent immigrants primarily males. The husband and the boarders would work outside the home while the women would take care of the chores necessary for maintaining a household. The diet would lean towards meat and very few dairy, fruit or vegetables. Wonderful opportunities exist for more understanding of Hungarians genealogy. Great strides have taken place in many parts of the United States to get a better understanding of this group. There heritages are being preserved and new resources are being discovered daily.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

MY GRANDFATHER WAS BORN IN HUNGARY IN 1902. THE TOWN IN WHICH HE WAS BORN WAS LITERALLY WIPED OFF THE MAP DURING WWI. I HAVE TRIED - UNSUCCESSFULLY- TO LOCATE EXACTLY WHEN AND WHERE THEY ARRIVED IN THIS COUNTRY. I KNOW THAT, AS A CHILD, HE LIVED IN CLEVELAND. HE APPEARS IN THE 1920 CENSUS, BUT I CANNOT FIND ANY OTHER INFORMATION. ANCESTRY.COM HAS GIVEN ME LITTLE INFORMATION.

www.HungarianFamilyRecord.org said...

Thanks for this great insightful article about the Hungarian community in Toledo . There is no place like Toledo (-:

Wish I lived there to get involve in community genealogy.

Magda
p.s. I am on a hiatus from blogging due to a family death but you are welcomed to look at my sight www.hungarianfamilyrecord.org

or www.hungarianfamilyrecord.blogspot.com